Rose Care Videos

Use the following rose care videos to learn more about basic rose care, diseases and pests.

Climber Pruning, Part I

Join Horticulturist Hillary Maurer as she and volunteers demonstrate how to prune a vigorous rose climber at Peninsula Park Rose Garden, in Portland, Oregon. 

Spring Pruning Roses, Part I

Normally, we would prune rose bushes in two phases: Fall or wind pruning, which takes the bush down to about 18 inches tall; and Spring pruning, which takes the bush down to 8-12 inches. This year, because of the pandemic, we decided to hard prune everything in the Fall. That way, we won’t have to go out in February, when we normally do Spring pruning.

This hard pruning also gives you a chance to clean out broken branches, crossed branches, woody and dead material. We like to shape the bush into a wine glass shape, with about 4 to 6 branches. Some varieties only give you 2 or 3 to work with. Others give you dozens. You have to adapt!

In any case, roses are hardy and seem to respond positively to pruning.

Spring Pruning Roses, Part II

A continuation of the Spring pruning demonstration. Normally we would perform this “hard” pruning in February, but due to the pandemic, we chose to prune heavily in the Fall. 

This hard pruning also gives you a chance to clean out broken branches, crossed branches, woody and dead material. We like to shape the bush into a wine glass shape, with about 4 to 6 branches. Some varieties only give you 2 or 3 to work with. Others give you dozens. You have to adapt!

In any case, roses are hardy and seem to respond positively to pruning.

Identifying Rose Midge Damage and Blind Shoots

While deadheading, you may see blind shoots caused by rose midge, or other causes. This very short video shows a couple of examples of what to look for and where to prune the damaged shoots.